Oxburgh Hall: Our Second Moated House

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We visited the National Trust’s Oxburgh Hall in Norfolk. The grounds, moat, and house are picturesque and we got to enjoy the views both in and outside “the castle.”

The Hall is actually a moated manor house, but it was constructed considerably after Igtham Mote.  Most of the construction is Jacobean, but the “fantasy” of castle grandeur is there.

The house is approached by way of a single bridge which takes you into a central courtyard.  The towers and general size are larger than its Kent cousin, and does provide more of a sense of the Medieval than its actual Medieval counterpart.

The National Trust run a small shop and tearoom, and there are a few bench seats in the courtyard to “take it in” from.

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Tea Room Window

We went to the tearoom in the main hall and sat in a dining area with some views of the grounds beyond. The service was a little unusual as we were asked to order outside the dining area, then were shown to a table and seated, and the order followed shortly thereafter.

The Assam tea was good, as was the hot chocolate (with a very generous helping of cream). The scones were a little on the crumbly side, and rather average in size. The clotted cream was good, though the jam was rather ordinary (even if National Trust branded).

Outside the moated area there are wooded walks, and well tended gardens.  It is well worth a visit just for the scenery.  The property also has outer “fortifications” which enclose the garden areas and main house, and there is an orchard with a variety of apples and pears.

This is a great place to visit, whether to chill in the gardens, or to explore the historic house.  It is also really interesting to compare with the experience of Igtham.
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