Finding Clarity: A Reverse Cinquain

Confused, Hands, Up, Unsure, Perplexed

Image by Robin Higgins from Pixabay

Confused
Uncertain in chaotic world
Seeking a mind-peaceful
Assuredness
No doubts

Colleen’s syllabic poetry theme this week is  “FINDING CLARITY.”  I have approached it as an goal to which we can aspire.  It is written in the reverse Cinquain form. Collen’s useful poetry form “cheatsheet” notes that “a . . . cinquain is a form of shape poetry and is always centered on the page. The required syllables needed for each line give it a unique shape. The cinquain (aka the quintain or the quintet) is a poem or stanza of five lines.”  A reverse Cinquain is “a form with one 5-line stanza in a syllabic pattern of two, eight, six, four, two.”  Confused?  Well, I hope you find clarity.

 

Padre

 

 

Evening: A Mirror Cinquain

Image Credit: © Ritu Bhathal

 

Evening
Houselights appear
Baths done, pajamas on
Children to be soon tucked in bed
Quiet

Moment
Drink before the television
School lunches still to pack
Doors checked -secured
Goodnight

A mirror cinquain is a syllabic poem form which consists of a  2/4/6/8/2 cinquain poem followed by a 2/8/6/4/2 reverse cinquain.

Composed for Colleen’s 2019 Weekly #Tanka Tuesday #Poetry Challenge No. 165 #PhotoPrompt

 

Padre

 

The Silken Temple: A Butterfly Cinquain

Pupa, Cocoon, Butterfly, Chrysalis

Sacred
The Dwelling Place.
Silken Thread Chrysalis –
Miraculous Transformation
Happens
Within its Mysterious Depths.
Former Caterpillar
Now Prepared For
The Sky.

 

The Butterfly Cinquain form is described as a nine-line syllabic poem with the pattern of two, four, six, eight, two, eight, six, four, two.

Pardon the cheesiness of writing a butterfly cinquain about butterflies.

 

Padre

 

Tale Weaver #259 – Temple

 

 

Believe: A Cinquain

 

Related image

 

Believe!

Believe in what?

Believe in you today.

So, I will believe in myself

Today

 

Padre

 

Genre Writing Challenge: Cinquain

Inspired by tanka, the cinquain is comprised of 2 syllables in the first line, 4 in the second line, 6 in the third, 8 in the fourth, and 2 in the fifth. Plus, poets have the freedom to add or subtract one syllable from each line.  (Writer’s Digest)

 

[I will make my usual Friday Foodie post tomorrow, sorry for the disruption of my usual blog schedule.]