Serving the Servant

There at the beginning, through Him all things were made

The Light of creation – yet He humility displayed

He came unto His own – they recognised Him not

It was all part of the plan – that He taught

For though rejected – a victory He won

For He opened a way for us to be called “son”

For in His weakness there was power

That has been passed on to you

So you may serve the Great Servant

And be lifted up too


Padre

Thanks to Pastor Vince and his message from John 1 today.

Her Request

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In writing today I honour her,

It is the thing she said was to be done,

I am to continue to pen the thoughts of my heart

Even though she is gone

 

She worried so on what I would do –

Would I simply drift away?

Neglecting myself,  pushing all aside –

She told me to keep writing anyway

 

So though my heart is broken,

My mind only numb,

I have penned this first postmortem poem

It is the thing she said was to be done

 

Maybe I will be stronger now,

In my effort her wish to fulfill

I have focused on a purpose

In so doing she’s with me still

 

Padre

 

Thank you Dianne for loving me so much that you planned for everything.  I love you too.

 

 

 

 

 

 

In Whose Image?

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Michelangelo – Public Domain

Genesis begins with a simple phrase in English: “In the beginning God  . . . .”  How often do we ponder this starting point?  In the biblical narrative it continues on to explain the sequence of creation.  Before all of it, however, God existed.  “At the creation, God created . . .” is one rendering of the Hebrew.  He was pre-existent.

As the Creator, He is the cosmological cause of each of us.  He has made us, not we ourselves.  Most theists (and people of faith more generally) will except this as a obvious truth.  Our physical forms are “inherited” from the long sequence of reproduction which begun with “In the beginning.”

We are not so forthcoming in our “making of ourselves” in spiritual, and social terms.  Think about the term: “self-made man/woman.”  The achievements and accomplishments are attributed to the hard work and talents of the individual, not to some divine plan.  We set our minds on a course, and off we go.  Or do we?

 

“Then God said, ‘Let Us make man in Our image, according to Our likeness; and let them rule over the fish of the sea and over the birds of the sky and over the cattle and over all the earth, and over every creeping thing that creeps on the earth.’ God created man in His own image, in the image of God He created him; male and female He created them (Genesis 1:26-27).”    Even is the rule and mastery humanity has shown over the creation, it was tasked to them by god.  It was a destiny set by God, not one of our creation.  So why should it be any less so in our individual lives?

Our purposes have a starting point: “For whom he did foreknow, he also did predestinate to be conformed to the image of his Son, that he might be the firstborn among many brethren (Romans 8:29). We are to be conformed to Jesus’ image.  Put simply to be Christ-like.   Yet Jesus was not one to do His own thing – to fly after any or every fancy.  Nor was he dictated by ego.  John 5:30 says in part, records Jesus’ words, “for I seek not my will, but the will of him that sent me.”  Again at Gethsemane, Jesus said, “Father, all things are possible to thee, take away this cup from me: nevertheless, not my will, but thine be done (Mark 14:36).”  

If we are truly conformed to God’s will – if we are Christ-like, we should be seeking what is good for His purposes, not what strokes our egos.  Let us test our motives.  Are we striving to be in God’s image, or are we trying to force His purposes into our wills.  Are we like some Medieval artist making God in the image of man, not man in the image of God?

 

Padre

Beyond The Blustery Sea

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Pastor Vince made a powerful side comment recently regarding his personal health.  In essence what he said was he that was not concerned with the outcome, as he is assured that the Lord is not going to take him, before God fulfilled his purpose with him.  The focus is on God and His plan, not our own.

Matthew 14: 25f reads, “Shortly before dawn Jesus went out to them [the disciples], walking on the lake.  When the disciples saw him walking on the lake, they were terrified. “It’s a ghost,” they said, and cried out in fear.  But Jesus immediately said to them: “Take courage! It is I. Don’t be afraid.” “Lord, if it’s you,” Peter replied, “tell me to come to you on the water.” “Come,” he said. Then Peter got down out of the boat, walked on the water and came toward Jesus. But when he saw the wind, he was afraid and, beginning to sink, cried out, “Lord, save me!”  Immediately Jesus reached out his hand and caught him. “You of little faith,” he said, “why did you doubt?” And when they climbed into the boat, the wind died down. Then those who were in the boat worshiped him, saying, “Truly you are the Son of God. [Italics mine]”

Jesus was walking on water.  This is clearly the act of God. It defies the laws of reason and of nature.  But what happens next is powerful.  Peter, a mere man, is allowed, with Jesus’ invitation, to join Him.  His sight was on the divine.  His goal was to be with his Lord.

Then Peter is distracted.  He takes his eyes off the object of his desire, his goal.  He sees the wind and the waves, and he sinks.  Wow!  Aren’t we like that?  We start off with great intentions.  We are on fire for our Lord, but the world (the symbolic wind and waves) steps in.  We lose our focus and we sink.

Thankfully, as in Peter’s case the Lord is there to reach out a hand and remind us of His presence.

I am thankful to the Lord for that assurance in the account of Peter.  And I am thankful for the example of godly men and women like Vince, that look beyond the blustery sea of life, and into the face of the Lord.

May we all do like-wise.

Padre