To Never Learn

Jim Adams’ challenge is to “select two songs and discuss some type of relevant association between them.” I have chosen to go with Gordon Lightfoot’s Protocol and Smith and Sinclair’s Again.

Lightfoot’s Protocol is from his 1976 Summertime Dream album which reached at Number 1 in Canada and Number 12 on the US Billboard chart. The sond goes through a list of several catagories of people who make fatal decisions, such as sea captains and generals who seek “mermaid’s tale” or victory all at too great a cost. By following “Protocol” lessons never seem to be learned and the cycle continues.

Lyrics:

Who are these ones who would lead us now
To the sound of a thousand guns
Who’d storm the gates of hell itself
To the tune of a single drum?

Where are the girls of the neighborhood bars
Whose loves were lost at sea
In the hills of France and on German soil
From Saigon to Wounded Knee?

Who come from long lines of soldiers
Whose duty was fulfilled
In the words of a warrior’s will
And protocol

Where are the boys in their coats of blue
Who flew when their eyes were blind?
Was God in town for the Roman games
Was he there when the deals were signed?

Who are the kings in their coats of mail
Who rode by the cross to die?
Did they all go down into worthiness?
Is it wrong for a king to cry?


And who are these ones who would have us now
Whose presence is concealed
Whose nature is revealed
In a time bomb?

Last of all you old sea dogs
Who travel after whale
You’d storm the gates of hell itself
For the taste of a mermaid’s tail
Who come from long lines of skippers
Whose duty was fulfilled
In the words of a warrior’s will
And protocol

Source: LyricFind

Songwriters: Gordon Lightfoot

Protocol lyrics © Warner Chappell Music, Inc

Again is from Songs For The Betrayed World which reflects on and furthers awareness of the Holocaust.  The song is haunting and asks key questions, and like Lightfoot’s song in a list.  The song notes that “you said Dachau would never happen again . . . since then Mỹ Lai, since then [the killing fields] Kampuchea, since then ethic cleansing and paralysis.”

I could not find a printed copy of the full lyrics of the song, but a listen will clearly show the parallels with Protocol, and that we never learn from our darkest deeds.


 

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Misty in the Lift


Jim Adams has challenged us to write about backgound or “elevator” music. One piece that I have liked, and that I have heard as instrumental background music is “Misty.” Ella Fitzgerald’s version is wonderful and calming. I have attached it to this post. I wasn’t able to get a true “elevator” version to play alongside it, but I have linked the composer’s version below:

The song (piece) was written in 1954 by pianist Erroll Garne as an instrumental. The lyrics were added a few years later and it was performed by Johnny Mathis reaching number 12 in the US. It has also been recorded Ella Fitzgerald (as attached) and Frank Sinatra.

Lyrics:

Thank you
I thank you so much

Look at me, I’m as helpless as a kitten up a tree
And I feel like I’m clingin’ to a cloud
I can’ t understand
I get misty, just holding your hand
Walk my way
And a thousand violins begin to play
Or it might be the sound of your hello
That music I hear

I get misty, whenever you’re near
You can’t see that you’re leading me on?
And it’s just what I want you to do
Don’t you notice how hopelessly I’m lost
That’s why I’m following you
On my own

When I wander through this wonderland alone
Never knowing my right foot from my left
My hat from my glove
I’m too misty, and too much in love
Too misty
And too much
In love


Look at meSource: Musixmatch

Songwriters: Garner Erroll / Burke Johnny

Misty lyrics © Octave-music Publishing Corp., Octave Music Publishing Corp., Reganesque Music Company, Marke-music Publishing Co., Inc., Octave Music Publ Corp, Marke-music Publishing Co Inc


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Danke schoen . . . Auf wiedersehen

Jim Adams’ challenge this week is to write about a song that has words that express different ways of saying goodbye. I recently rewatched Ferris Bueller’s Day Off which contained Wayne Newton’s version of Bert Kaempfert’s song Danke Schoen. The version reached number13 on Billboard‘s pop chart, and third on the easy listening chart. It’s place in the 1986 movie was a spring back in the song’s popularity as well. Auf wiedersehen and thank you.

Lyrics:

Danke schoen, darling, danke schoen
Thank you for all the joy and pain
Picture shows, second balcony
Was the place we’d meet
Second seat, go Dutch treat, you were sweet

Danke schoen, darling, danke schoen
Save those lies, darling don’t explain
I recall Central Park in fall
How you tore your dress
What a mess, I confess, that’s not all

Danke schoen, darling, danke schoen
Thank you for walks down Lover’s Lane
I can see hearts carved on a tree
Letters intertwined for all time
Yours and mine, that was fine

Danke schoen, darling, danke schoen
Thank you for seeing me again
Though we go on our separate ways
Still the memory stays for always

My heart says danke schoen
Danke schoen, oh darling, danke schoen
I said thank you for, hmm, seeing me again
Though we go on our separate ways
Still the memory stays for always

My heart says danke schoen
Danke schoen, auf wiedersehen
Danke schoen

Source: LyricFind

Songwriters: Bert Kaempfert / Kurt Schwabach / Milt GablerDanke Schoen lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC


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Legs Went On Forever


Jim Adams’ challenge is to write about a song which has lyrics including Endless/Eternity/ Everlasting/Forever/Infinity and Omega.   I have posted about Jethro Tull’s Budapest before, but it fits this prompt really well. The song is from the Crest of a Knave album released in 1987.   “Her legs went on for ever. Like staring up at infinity,” is such a descriptive line, and fits the theme perfectly.   For those that don’t know Tull’s music -“The flute is a heavy, metal instrument!” sums it up well.

Lyrics:   I think she was a middle-distance runner…
(The translation wasn’t clear).
Could be a budding stately hero.
International competition in a year.
She was a good enough reason for a party…
(Well, you couldn’t keep up on a hard track mile)
While she ran a perfect circle.
And she wore a perfect smile
In Budapest… hot night in Budapest. We had to cozzy up in the old gymnasium…
Dusting off the mandolins and checking on the gear.
She was helping out at the back-stage…
Stopping hearts and chilling beer.
Yes, and her legs went on for ever.
Like staring up at infinity
Through a wisp of cotton panty
Along a skin of satin sea.
Hot night in Budapest. You could cut the heat, peel it back with the wrong side of a knife.
Feel it blowing from the sidefills. Feel like you were playing for your life
(If not the money).
Hot night in Budapest. She bent down to fill the ice box
And stuffed some more warm white wine in
Like some weird unearthly vision
Wearing only T-shirt, pants and skin.
You know, it rippled, just a hint of muscle.
But the boys and me were heading west
So we left her to the late crew
And a hot night in Budapest.
It was a hot night in Budapest. She didn’t speak much English language…
(She didn’t speak much anyway).
She wouldn’t make love, but she could make good sandwich
And she poured sweet wine before we played. Hey, Budapest, cha, cha, cha. Let’s watch her now. I thought I saw her at the late night restaurant.
She would have sent blue shivers down the wall.
But she didn’t grace our table.
In fact, she wasn’t there at all.
Yes, and her legs went on forever.
Like staring up at infinity.
Her heart was spinning to the west-lands
And she didn’t care to be
That night in Budapest.
Hot night in Budapest.  

Source: LyricFind   Songwriters: Ian Anderson

Budapest lyrics © BMG Rights Management  


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Gloom, Despair


Jim Adams’ challenge this week is to tell about a song that contains words such as Anguish/Misery/Torment. Though rather light on lyrics, Hee Haw‘s “Gloom, Despair . . . ” was a recurring piece on the show. The programme ran on CBS from 1969 to 1971, in syndication from 1971 to 1993, and on TNN from 1996 to 1997. I think it captures the prompt perfectly.


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Donald’s Trousers?

Jim Adams’ challenge this week is to write about a song containing weather references such as –  Breeze/Cloud/Sky/Wind. Andy Stewart’s Donald Where’s Your Troosers? which was first released in 1960, takes the wind very much into consideration as a Scotsman faces all weathers in his kilt. The song reached number 37 in the UK  and number 1 in Canada.  It was re-released in 1989, it became an even bigger hit, reaching number 4 in the UK.

Donald Where’s Your Troosers?

I’ve just come down from the Isle of Skye
I’m no very big and I’m awful shy
And the lassies shout when I go by
Donald, where’s your troosers?

Let the wind blow high, let the wind blow low
Through the streets in my kilt, I’ll go
All the lassies say hello
Donald, where’s your troosers?

A lassie took me to a ball
And it was slippery in the hall
And I was feared that I would fall
For I had nae on my troosers

Let the wind blow high, let the wind blow low
Through the streets in my kilt, I’ll go
All the lassies say hello
Donald, where’s your troosers?

Now I went down to London Town
And I had some fun in the underground
The ladies turned their heads around
Saying, Donald, where are your trousers?

Let the wind blow high, let the wind blow low
Through the streets in my kilt, I’ll go
All the lassies say hello
Donald, where’s your troosers?

To wear the kilt is my delight
It is not wrong, I know it’s right
The Highlanders would get a fright
If they saw me in the trousers

Let the wind blow high, let the wind blow low
Through the streets in my kilt, I’ll go
All the lassies say hello
Donald, where’s your troosers?

The lassies want me every one
Well, let them catch me if they can
You can not take the breaks off a Highland man
And I don’t wear the troosers

Let the wind blow high, let the wind blow low
Through the streets in my kilt, I’ll go
All the lassies say hello
Donald, where’s your troosers?
Donald, where’s your troosers?
Donald, where’s your troo…

Oh, well, that’s the way we sing the song in Scotland
But of course the song might have more international appeal
Sung something like this
One, two, three, four

Well, I’ve just come down from the Isle of Skye
I’m not very big and I’m awful shy
The lassies shout when I go by
Hey, Donald, where’s your troosers?

Let the wind blow high, let the wind blow low
Through the streets in my kilt, I’ll go
All the lassies shout, go, go
Hey, Donald, where’s your troosers?

Oh, man, I’m all rock and roll
And I’m a-moving and a-grooving to save my soul
Grab your kilt and go, go, go
Hey, Donald, where’s your troosers?

Let the wind blow high, let the wind blow low
Through the streets in my kilt, I’ll go
Oh, yeah, go, go, go
Hey, Donald, where’s your troosers?
Hey, Donald, where’s your troosers?
Yeah, hey, Donald

Hey, just a minute, what are you doing there?
(Man, I’m rocking it, man, man, I’m really moving it, man)
Well just you stop rocking it and moving it, man
The song should be sung just exactly like this

I’ve just come down from the Isle of Skye
I’m not very big and I’m awful shy
And the lassies shout when I go by
Donald, where’s your troosers?

Let the wind blow high, let the wind blow low
Through the streets in my kilt, I’ll go
All the lassies say hello
Donald, where’s your troosers?

Source: Musixmatch

Songwriters: Andy Stewart


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Long and Winding Road


Jim Adams has challenged us to write about songs with  Long/Short/Small/Tall as lyrics. The Beatles’ The Long and Winding Road fits well. The song from the album Let It Be album was written by Paul McCartney. As a single it was issued after the group’s break-up and became their last number one on the US charts.

Lyrics:

The long and winding road
That leads to your door
Will never disappear
I’ve seen that road before
It always leads me here
Lead me to you doorThe wild and windy night
That the rain washed away
Has left a pool of tears
Crying for the day
Why leave me standing here?
Let me know the wayMany times I’ve been alone
And many times I’ve cried
Anyway, you’ll never know
The many ways I’ve triedAnd still they lead me back
To the long winding road
You left me standing here
A long, long time ago
Don’t leave me waiting here
Lead me to your doorBut still they lead me back
To the long winding road
You left me standing here
A long, long time ago
Don’t keep me waiting here
Lead me to your door

Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah

Source: LyricFind

Songwriters: John Lennon / Paul McCartney

The Long and Winding Road lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC


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If You Could Read My Mind


Jim Adams’ challenge this week is to tell about a song with Brain/Mind/Think in the title or lyrics. Gordon Lightfoot’s “If You Could Read My Mind” is a such a song. It reached number 1 on the Canadian Singles Chart in 1970 and then number 5 on Billboard and number 30 in the UK.

Lyrics:

If You Could Read My Mind, ©1969 by Gordon Lightfoot

If you could read my mind, love,
What a tale my thoughts could tell.
Just like an old time movie,
'Bout a ghost from a wishing well.
In a castle dark or a fortress strong,
With chains upon my feet.
You know that ghost is me.
And I will never be set free
As long as I'm a ghost that you can't see. 
                                        
If I could read your mind, love,
What a tale your thoughts could tell.
Just like a paperback novel,
The kind the drugstores sell.
Then you reached the part where the heartaches come,
The hero would be me.
But heroes often fail,
And you won't read that book again
Because the ending's just too hard to take!
                                        
I'd walk away like a movie star
Who gets burned in a three way script.
Enter number two:
A movie queen to play the scene
Of bringing all the good things out in me.
But for now, love, let's be real;
I never thought I could  feel this way
And I've got to say that I just don't get it.
I don't know where we went wrong,
But the feeling's gone
And I just can't get it back. 
                                        
If you could read my mind, love,
What a tale my thoughts could tell.
Just like an old time movie,
'Bout a ghost from a wishing well.
In a castle dark or a fortress strong.
With chains upon my feet.
But stories always end,
And if you read between the lines,
You'd know that I'm just tryin' to understand
The feelin's that you lack.
I never thought I could feel this way
And I've got to say that I just don't get it.
I don't know where we went wrong,
But the feelin's gone
And I just can't get it back!

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Lily The Pink

Jim Adams has challenged us with sharing a song which contains colours. “Lily the Pink” is a 1968 song by the UK group The Scaffold and it reached number 1 on the UK charts. Ms Pink it seems invented a potent medicine that “cures” all. I have attached the video of the Irish Rovers’ cover of the song.

 We’ll drink a drink, a drink

To Lily the Pink, the Pink, the Pink

The savior of the human race

For she invented medicinal compound

Most efficacious in every case

 

Mr. Freers had sticky out ears

And it made him awful shy

And so they gave him medicinal compound

And now he’s learning how to fly

 

Robert Tony was known to be bony

He would never eat his meal

And so they gave him medicinal compound

Now they move him round on wheels

 

We’ll drink a drink, a drink

To Lily the Pink, the Pink, the pink

The savior of the human race

For she invented medicinal compound

Most efficacious in every case

 

Old Ebenezer thought he was Julius Caesar

And so they put him in a home

Where they gave him medicinal compound

And now he’s emperor of Rome

 

Johnny Hammer had a terrible st-st-st-st-stammer

He could hardly s-s-say a word

And so they gave him medicinal compound

Now’s he’s seen, but never heard

 

We’ll drink a drink, a drink

To Lily the Pink, the Pink, the Pink

The savior of the human race

For she invented medicinal compound

Most efficacious in every case

 

Aunty Milly ran willy-nilly

When her legs they did recede

And so they rubbed on medicinal compound

Now they call her Milly Pede

 

Jennifer Eccles had terrible freckles

And the boys all called her names

But she changed medicinal compound

Now he joins in all the games

 

We’ll drink a drink, a drink

To Lily the Pink, the Pink, the Pink

The savior of the human race

For she invented medicinal compound

Most efficacious in every case

 

Lily the Pink, she turned to drink

She filled up with paraffin inside

And despite her medicinal compound

Sadly pickled Lily died

 

Up to heaven her soul ascended

All the church bells they did ring

She took with her medicinal compound

Hark the herald angels sing

 

We’ll drink a drink, a drink

To Lily the Pink, the Pink, the Pink

The savior of the human race

For she invented medicinal compound

Most efficacious in every case

 

Source: Musixmatch

Songwriters: Trad / John Henry Gorman / Roger Joseph Mcgough / Michael Mcgear

Lily The Pink lyrics © Noel Gay Music Co. Ltd.


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Snoopy Vs. The Red Baron

Jim Adams has challenged us to write about a song that contains the words Chat/Laugh/Rant/Scream/Talk. I have picked a song about another challenge – the classic duel between the Red Baron and the Peanuts’ Snoopy in 1966. The Royal Guardsmen’s song was written by Phil Gernhard & Dick Holler and was released in November 1966. It tells how Charles Schultz’s comics depicted Snoopy imagining himself as a WWI fighter pilot, battling the Red Baron Manfred von Richthofen.

The song sparked all kinds of images for me as a pre-teen on its release, and I thought it would be a fun addition today.

Lyrics:


After the turn of the century
In the clear blue skies over Germany
Came a roar and a thunder men had never heard
Like the screamin’ sound of a big war bird


Up in the sky, a man in a plane
Baron von Richthofen was his name
Eighty men tried, and eighty men died
Now, they’re buried together on the countryside


Ten, twenty, thirty, forty, fifty or more
The Bloody Red Baron was rollin’ up the score
Eighty men died tryin’ to end that spree
Of the Bloody Red Baron of Germany


In the nick of time, a hero arose
A funny-lookin’ dog with a big black nose
He flew into the sky to seek revenge
But the Baron shot him down (Curses, foiled again!)


Ten, twenty, thirty, forty, fifty or more
The Bloody Red Baron was rollin’ up the score
Eighty men died tryin’ to end that spree
Of the Bloody Red Baron of Germany

Now, Snoopy had swore that he’d get that man
So he asked the Great Pumpkin for a new battle plan
He challenged the German to a real dogfight
While the Baron was laughin‘, he got him in his sight


That Bloody Red Baron was in a fix
He tried everything, but he’d run out of tricks
Snoopy fired once, and he fired twice
And that Bloody Red Baron went spinnin’ out of sight


Ten, twenty, thirty, forty, fifty or more
The Bloody Red Baron was rollin’ up the score
Eighty men died tryin’ to end that spree
Of the Bloody Red Baron of Germany


Well, ten, twenty, thirty, forty, fifty or more
The Bloody Red Baron was rollin’ up the score


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