Adventures To Seek: A Tanka

Pixabay

 

Journeying onwards
New discoveries to make 
Along trails unknown
Amid hills and wide grasslands
Untold adventure to seek

 

Padre

Inspiration Call: Tanka  A Tanka is a Japanese poem and similar to a Haiku, however it has seven lines. Tankas are nature, seasons, love, and other emotions. Line one has a five syllable count, line two is seven syllables, line three is five syllables, line four is seven syllables, and line five seven syllables. In total it has thirty one syllables.

Day After: A Tanka

Live, Jump, Joy, Lifestyle, Way Of Life, Dance

Pixabay

Colleen M. Chesebro‘s syllabic poetry challenge this week is to write on the theme of “the day after.”  I have coupled this with current events and Fandango’s One-Word Challenge to use the word “preview.”

My thoughts of freedom
Are but a scanty preview
Of all of the things
I will do the day after
Self-isolation is through

Padre

Tranquility

imageedit_4_8924001272 (1).jpg

Abbey Gardens

“All is Calm,” is one of Maria Antonia’s photo challenges for this year.  Here is a photo I took at the Japanese Garden in Abbey Gardens in Bury St Edmunds.  It was a peaceful day out with my wife, and we were able to enjoy the tranquility of the place.  All was indeed calm, in fact it was near perfection.

Sunshine drenched fountain
A day of tranquility
Peaceful and calming
Light playing upon the pool
Flowers fill the world with scent

Padre

 

 

New Life Ashore: A Tanka

Broken hopes and dreams
Upon the beach shattered lie
By nature’s storm breath
Lucrative catches ended
Bringing a new life ashore

Padre

Inspiration Call: Week 11 March 2020 Writing Prompts: Tanka

“A Tanka is a Japanese poem and similar to a Haiku, however it has seven lines. Tankas are nature, seasons, love, and other emotions.  Line one has a five syllable count, line two is seven syllables, line three is five syllables, line four is seven syllables, and line five seven syllables. In total it has thirty one syllables.  It uses simile, metaphor, and personification.”

 

Lincoln’s Thanksgiving Proclamation: Tanka

Antietam, Maryland, Cannon, Battlefield

Image by David Mark from Pixabay

 

An Autumn wind blows
Over Antietam’s field
Abe admonishes
A nation in need of hope
To give trust and thanks above

 

In October 1863 the American Civil War (War Between the States) was in its third year.  1861 and most of ’62 had done badly for the Union.  Then a battle at Sharpsburg, Maryland gave a glimmer of short-lived hope.  But July ’63 saw victories at both Vicksburg and Gettysburg. At the prompting of Sarah Josepha Buell Hale, Lincoln called the nation to a day of thanksgiving.

Padre

posted on d’Verse

 

 

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Noon: A Tanka

Skyscrapers, Sky, Glass, Buildings, City, Architecture

Pixabay

With sun bathed brightness
Midday has finally come
Shining orb’s zenith
Bored office workers scramble
For coffee and sandwiches

Padre

A tanka is a thirty-one-syllable poem.  In Japanese, tanka translates as “short song,” and typically takes a five line, 5/7/5/7/7 syllable form.